A message to our patrons regarding COVID-19

Harris Theater

harris theater at home

We’re excited to open the Harris Theater @ Home, a virtual cinema accessible through this website. While we know this doesn’t compare to the experience of coming to the Cultural District for a visit to the Harris Theater, we hope to continue to celebrate the diversity of cinematic artistry by providing the best of independent, international and documentary films.

Through our website, patrons will be able to purchase tickets to films currently unavailable for public rental or sale. The film distributor will share a portion of your ticket payment with the Harris Theater, meaning patrons can continue to support the Harris Theater while watching high-quality independent film from home. Thank you for your continued support of the Harris Theater, and we can’t wait for the opportunity to open our doors, turn on the lights in our lobby, and share the collective experience of cinema once again.

2021 Oscar Nominated Short Films movie poster

 

2021 Oscar Nominated Short Films

Available to stream April 2 - April 25

Oscar Nominated Shorts are available for 30 days after purchase. Once you begin to view, you must finish viewing within 72 hours.

ANIMATED SHORTS (Running Time: 99 minutes)

Burrow – Madeline Sharafian and Michael Capbarat (USA, 6 min.)
Genius Loci – Adrien Mérigeau and Amaury Ovise (France, 16 min.)
Opera – Erick Oh (USA, 9 min.)
If Anything Happens I Love You – Will McCormack and Michael Govier (USA, 12 min.)
Yes-People – Gísli Darri Halldórsson and Arnar Gunnarsson (Iceland, 8 min.)

PLUS A SELECTION OF ADDITIONAL ANIMATED SHORTS (from the AMPAS shortlist):

Kapaemahu (USA, 8 min.)
The Snail and the Whale (UK/Germany, 26 min.)
To Gerard (USA, 7 min.)

LIVE ACTION SHORTS (Running Time: 130 minutes)

The Present – Farah Nabulsi (Palestine, 25 min.)
Feeling Through – Doug Roland and Susan Ruzenski (USA, 19 min.)
Two Distant Strangers – Travon Free and Martin Desmond Roe (USA, 25 min.)
White Eye – Tomer Shushan and Shira Hochman (Israel, 21 min.)
The Letter Room – Elvira Lind and Sofia Sondervan (USA, 33 min.)

DOCUMENTARY SHORTS (Running Time: 136 minutes)

A Love Song for Latasha – Sophia Nahli Allison and Janice Duncan (USA, 18 min.)
Do Not Split – Anders Hammer and Charlotte Cook (USA/Norway, 36 min.)
Hunger Ward – Skye Fitzgerald and Michael Scheuerman (USA, 40 min.)
Colette – Anthony Giacchino and Alice Doyard (France/Germany/USA, 24 min.)
A Concerto Is a Conversation – Ben Proudfoot and Kris Bowers (USA, 13 min.)

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Mary Lou Williams: The Lady Who Swings The Band movie poster

 

Mary Lou Williams: The Lady Who Swings The Band

Available to stream April 5 - April 30

She was ahead of her time, a genius. During an era when Jazz was the nation's popular music, Mary Lou Williams was one of its greatest innovators. As both a pianist and composer, she was a font of daring and creativity who helped shape the sound of 20th century America. And like the dynamic, turbulent nation in which she lived, Williams seemed to redefine herself with every passing decade. From child prodigy to "Boogie-Woogie Queen" to groundbreaking composer to mentoring some of the greatest musicians of all time, Mary Lou Williams never ceased to astound those who heard her play. But away from the piano, Williams was a woman in a "man's world," a black person in a "whites only" society, an ambitious artist who dared to be different, and who struggled against the imperatives of being a "star." Above all, she did not fit the (still) prevailing notions of where genius comes from or what it looks like. Time and again, she pushed back against a world that said, "You can't" and said, "I can." It nearly cost her everything.

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Jazz on a Summer's Day movie poster

 

Jazz on a Summer's Day

Available to stream April 5 - April 30

Filmed at the 1958 Newport Jazz Festival in Rhode Island and directed by world-renowned photographer Bert Stern, Jazz on a Summer's Day features intimate performances by an all-star line-up of musical legends including Louis Armstrong, Thelonious Monk, Gerry Mulligan, Anita O'Day, Chuck Berry, Dinah Washington, and closes with a beautiful rendition of The Lord's Prayer by Mahalia Jackson at midnight to usher in Sunday morning. The film has been beautifully and extensively restored in 4K from the best surviving vault elements by IndieCollect.

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exterior of Harris Theater

 


The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust's Harris Theater is one of the most active arts facilities in the region showing art films nearly every day of the year. 

Formerly known as the Art Cinema, the Harris Theater represents a milestone in the redevelopment of Liberty Avenue. The Art Cinema was the first moving picture house in Pittsburgh to commercially show art movies until competition from other city theaters led to its conversion to an adult movie house in the 1960s. As part of its mission to transform the Cultural District, the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust purchased and restored the facility leading to further conversions of run-down properties along the Liberty Avenue corridor. With 194 seats for movies and 178 seats for live performances, the Harris Theater officially opened to the public on November 9, 1995.

The Harris was named through a gift from the Buhl Foundation after John P. Harris, co-founder of the Nickelodeon—the first theater solely dedicated to the showing of motion pictures—and a Pennsylvania State Senator. The Harris Theater features contemporary, foreign and classic films. 

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Directions

The address is 809 Liberty Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15222.


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